Precision Medicine will need to get out of the pharma silo that is based on symptoms


Welcome to the digital era of biology (and to this modest blog I started in early 2005).

To cure many diseases, like cancer or cystic fibrosis, we will need to target genes (mutations, for ex.), not organs! I am convinced that the future of replacement medicine (organ transplant) is genomics (the science of the human genome). In 10 years we will be replacing (modifying) genes; not organs!


Anticipating the $100 genome era and the P4™ medicine revolution. P4 Medicine (Predictive, Personalized, Preventive, & Participatory): Catalyzing a Revolution from Reactive to Proactive Medicine.


After low-cost airlines (Ryanair, Easyjet ...) comes "low-cost" participatory medicine. Some of my readers have recently christened this long-lasting, clumsy attempt at e-writing of mine "THE LOW-COSTE INNOVATION BLOG". I am an
early adopter of scientific MOOCs. My name's Catherine Coste. I've earned myself four MIT digital diplomas: 7.00x, 7.28x1, 7.28.x2 and 7QBWx. Instructor of 7.00x: Eric Lander PhD.

Upcoming books: Airpocalypse, a medical thriller (action taking place in Beijing) 2017; Jesus CRISPR Superstar, a sci-fi -- French title: La Passion du CRISPR (2018).

I love Genomics. Would you rather donate your data, or... your vital organs?

Audio files on this blog are Windows files ; if you have a Mac, you might want to use VLC (http://www.videolan.org) to read them.

Concernant les fichiers son ou audio (audio files) sur ce blog : ce sont des fichiers Windows ; pour les lire sur Mac, il faut les ouvrir avec VLC (http://www.videolan.org).


When Will Genomics Cure Cancer?

IN DUE COURSE "Genomics is just picking up steam, the Broad Institute's Eric Lander tells The Atlantic. As a comparison, Lander notes that it took some 75 years to go from understanding that microbes cause infectious diseases to the widespread implementation of antibiotics to treat those diseases. 'With genomics, we're maybe halfway through that cycle — something like the situation around 1915, when early, highly imperfect antibiotics were first introduced,' he says.
Currently, genomics is working on getting a sort of parts list together for what genes are involved in certain diseases and how those genes interact in networks. While Lander says that this is not a cure for any disease, having such knowledge is influencing treatment, though it is still early days there too.
New targeted drugs for cancer, he tells The Atlantic, have been able to make certain tumors disappear, though as the tumors mutate, they find a way to recur. But now, he says, researchers can target those new mutations as well and take a lesson from how HIV has been treated to turn it into a chronic disease.
'What made it become a chronic, treatable disease? It was a combination of three drugs. Any one of those drugs alone, the virus could mutate its way around,' Lander says. 'But with the combination of all three, the chance that a virus could find its way around all of them was vanishingly small. That's what's going to be happening in cancer.' He adds, though, that it will take time and investment."

Genome Web: The Daily Scan, Jan. 09/2014

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