Precision Medicine will need to get out of the pharma silo that is based on symptoms


Welcome to the digital era of biology (and to this modest blog I started in early 2005).

To cure many diseases, like cancer or cystic fibrosis, we will need to target genes (mutations, for ex.), not organs! I am convinced that the future of replacement medicine (organ transplant) is genomics (the science of the human genome). In 10 years we will be replacing (modifying) genes; not organs!


Anticipating the $100 genome era and the P4™ medicine revolution. P4 Medicine (Predictive, Personalized, Preventive, & Participatory): Catalyzing a Revolution from Reactive to Proactive Medicine.


After low-cost airlines (Ryanair, Easyjet ...) comes "low-cost" participatory medicine. Some of my readers have recently christened this long-lasting, clumsy attempt at e-writing of mine "THE LOW-COSTE INNOVATION BLOG". I am an
early adopter of scientific MOOCs. My name's Catherine Coste. I've earned myself four MIT digital diplomas: 7.00x, 7.28x1, 7.28.x2 and 7QBWx. Instructor of 7.00x: Eric Lander PhD.

Upcoming books: Doomsdare, a medical thriller (action taking place in Beijing) Fall 2016; Jesus CRISPR Superstar, a sci-fi -- French title: La Passion du CRISPR (2017). Special thanks to Prof. Emmanuel Lincot, lawyer David Kilgour and Isabelle Provost for their help.

I love Genomics. Would you rather donate your data, or... your vital organs?

Audio files on this blog are Windows files ; if you have a Mac, you might want to use VLC (http://www.videolan.org) to read them.

Concernant les fichiers son ou audio (audio files) sur ce blog : ce sont des fichiers Windows ; pour les lire sur Mac, il faut les ouvrir avec VLC (http://www.videolan.org).


Genealogy of a Ghost

I am a specialist in German literature. How come I started a blog on transplant in 2005??

Well, my favorite author, the one I've been studying most extensively I guess, is Paul Celan.

"Dein goldenes Haar Margarethe
Dein ashenes Haar Sulamith."

Celan is mostly about Shoah. You'd think this has nothing to do with the medical world of organ transplants. When I spoke with transplant nurses (coordinators) more than a decade ago, the first thing they told me about transplants was: "Here you've got to get used to one thing: this constant flux of people coming and people going. They keep coming, and going. Some are arriving, some are departing... I know I won't be able to deal with this... this kind of guilt... forever. You can't work as a coordinator forever."

It took me a while to figure out what this was all about. Sometimes you see two people who seem to be equally sick. One of them will make it (thanks to the transplant), the other one is the "donor" (heart, lungs, liver...). He is dead/dying. One of them will live, the other one will die. Sometimes they retrieve so many organs and tissues from a single "donor" that the equation is different. One will die, many and many will survive (>50!!).

"Dein goldenes Haar Margarethe
Dein ashenes Haar Sulamith."

Yup. Makes perfect sense. Even for a transplant coordinator.

If I was going to tell a story, I would want to tell both sides of it.

Do you believe in Tyche, the deity of fortune and luck?


Maybe people who study literature for a long time like I did end up seeing ghosts. Maybe I got "spirited away" by Paul Celan... But the interesting thing is that my ghosts (Celan is one of them, there are others) seem to thrive in the world of technology, today's world... This is the reason why I started writing sci-fi. My co-writer Isa has some different motivation(s).

Interestingly, I chanced upon an Australian Doctor & Writer, Leah Kaminsky; she's writing about genomics and also about her own private ghosts. The world is small...

Do you believe in Tyche, the deity of fortune and luck?




What Leah told me the other day: fiction writing takes time. Isa and I have been working on our trilogy (scifi) since 2009...

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